Boston Housing Authority

For Public Housing > Resident Services > Youth/Family

Youth and Family Services

 

Educating the Mind and Leaving Drugs and Violence Behind

What is Educating the Mind and Leaving Drugs and Violence Behind?
Educating the Mind is a five-week mentorship basketball league and clinic that takes place over five weeks in the summer. Boston Housing Authority (BHA) residents ages 8 through 18 are encouraged to cultivate their skills on the court – and not engage in violence and substance abuse. Participants are transported to the Boys & Girls Club in Roxbury and attend conflict resolution and drug prevention workshops prior to basketball practice.

How do I join?
Interested youth should contact Greg Davis at (617) 988-5101.


This Way Ahead Program (TWA)

Want to gain important job-readiness skills? Want the chance to apply for a paid summer internship with The Gap, Old Navy, or Banana Republic? Apply today for This Way Ahead! 

This Way Ahead (TWA) is a paid job readiness and internship program for youth ages 16-24 who live in subsidized housing in partnership with Gap Inc. and Boston Housing Authority. For the past 4 years, This Way Ahead has provided 220 young people with job readiness training. Gap Inc. has hosted over 100 TWA interns in their stores and offered more than 80% of those interns ongoing employment after the summer.

Program Overview: Beginning in January, participants attend interactive job readiness classes once a week in the afternoon/evening for 16 weeks. Once they complete the job readiness classes, they can apply for paid, supported summer internships at local Gap, Old Navy, and Banana Republic stores, with the possibility of continuing on to permanent/seasonal employment in the fall. This Way Ahead also offers job search support for students who do not continue on to the internship portion of the program.

Applying/Questions: To apply or to learn more about the program, youth should contact Beth Jameson, TWA Program Coordinator, at 617-499-7125 (office) or 617-942-1737 (cell). See also the Program flyer
 

Youth Leadership Institute (YLI)

What is YLI?
BHA’s Youth Leadership Institute (YLI) is a youth mentorship and work experience program established in the summer of 2010 in partnership with the City of Boston and various community partners. The purpose is to prepare BHA resident ages 15 through 21 the necessary skills for the work force.

How does YLI work?
Each applicant is referred through a process established by the Mayor’s Youth Fund. Applicants go through the interview process and are assigned a work site based on his or her interests and experience. Once selected, participants are placed at a BHA department, development or community partner site.

How do I join?
Interested applicants must register through the Boston Youth Fund (BYF)’s HOPELINE during the open registration period in February and March. For more information, applicants may contact Greg Davis at (617) 988-5101.
 

SUCCESSLINK/Youth Employment

What is the SuccessLink Summer Employment Program (formerly HOPELINE)?
BHA partners with Boston Youth Fund (BYF) to offer young people a positive job experience. Each February, youth applicants register with the BYF SuccessLink to be eligible for being offered a summer job. Registrants must be a resident of the City of Boston between the ages of 15 and 17. Boston Youth Fund strives to hire as many SuccessLink applicants as possible.

How do I join?
Visit the Boston Youth Fund for more information. The Community Services Department also regularly updates residents about youth employment opportunities.
 

Smart from the Start

What is Smart from the Start?
Smart from the Start is a family support, community engagement and school readiness program designed to empower low-income families with young children overcome the achievement gap and chronic poverty. This program is available to public housing and Section 8 residents in Charlestown, Roslindale, Mattapan, Dorchester, Jamaica Plain, Lower Roxbury and the South End.

How do I join?
For more information and/or referral, contact your Resident Services Coordinator or Cherie Craft, Executive Director of Smart from the Start, at (617) 635-5030.
 

Big Brothers Big Sisters (BBBS)

What is BBBS?
Big Brothers Big Sisters and the Big Sisters of Greater Boston offer an ongoing, one-on-one mentoring program that pairs children 7 through 12 years of age (“Littles”) with an adult guide (“Bigs”). Bigs and Littles participate in various activities together, offering an opportunity for both to learn and grow while having a positive impact on their communities. This program is available to residents throughout the City and is often coordinated with the child’s school; we also have several special programs at Mildred C. Hailey Apartments, Franklin Field and Lenox Camden.

How do I join?
For more information and/or referral, contact your Resident Services Coordinator; Morgan Randal, Big Sister of Greater Boston, at (617) 236-8057; or Terrence McCarron, BBBS Director of Program Services at (617) 956-0250.

Girl Scouts of America

What is Girl Scouts of America?
Girl Scouting builds girls of courage, confidence and character to make the world a better place. Girl Scouts of Eastern Massachusetts serves girls grades K-12 and engages adult volunteers in the 178 communities they serve. Girl Scouts are currently offering a variety of programs for BHA residents at or near BHA housing developments. Girl Scouts also offers summer camp experiences.

How do I join?
For more information and/or referral, contact your Services Coordinator or Denise Dixon for the Girl Scouts of Eastern Massachusetts at (857) 453-5311.
 

After School Program Collaborations

YouthLink

What is YouthLink?
Youth Link offers prevention and early intervention programs in partnership with police departments, housing authorities and dedicated business leaders who support eliminating crime by offering new possibilities to youth at risk of violence and gang involvement. The program has offered programs to youth living in BHA’s Franklin Field Development since 2008.

Youth Link Academy approaches are based on best practices to help young people develop important life skills necessary to have a positive impact in their communities and schools. Core facets of the program include mentoring, college prep and tours, culinary arts, leadership, communication and presentation skills and mediation training. Youth Link’s efforts have resulted in reduced juvenile crime, increased educational attainments and goal attainment.

How do I join?
For more information and/or referral, contact Joseph Robinson, BHA Evening Program Coordinator for Franklin Field, at (857) 243-5531 or (617) 988-5336.
 

Boston Centers for Youth and Families (BCYF)

What is BCYF?
Boston Centers for Youth and Families (BCYF) offers a range of affordable programs for preschool and school-aged children and adults. Programs offered include education, family literacy, youth employment, violence prevention & intervention, senior activities, recreation and enrichment. BCYF has 35 facilities throughout Boston. BCYF’s programs also include Summer Camps.

Read BCYF’s Summer 2017 Guide to Programs to learn about this year’s summer programs. You can also visit the website or call (617) 635-KIDS (5437).

How do I join?
For more information and referrals, contact your Resident Services Coordinator or BCYF at (617) 635-4920 to find the Community Center nearest to you.

 

Information from the Mayor's Office of New Bostonians on the Executive Action on Immigration

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The Executive Action on Immigration[1]

  • On November 20, 2014, President Obama announced an executive action to address several issues in our immigration system.
  • This action will protect an estimated 65,000 undocumented people in Massachusetts from deportation and allow them to obtain a work permit and a driver’s license if they meet eligibility requirements.
  • The applicant will have to renew their application every three years.
  • This action will not lead to a green card or citizenship as Congress must vote to change immigration laws to allow for a path to citizenship.
     
  • At this time, no applications are available for the new forms of relief. Please be careful of scams.
  • "Notarios,” notary publics, immigration consultants and businesses cannot give you immigration legal advice. In many other countries, the word “notario” means that the individual is an attorney, but that is not true in the United States. If you need help with immigration issues, be very careful before paying money to anyone who is neither an attorney nor a BIA-accredited representative of a recognized organization.[2]
  • Applications will be available sometime before May 19, 2015 for DAPA and February 18, 2015 for DACA but there is no definitive date yet.
  • Once the applications are available, the City of Boston will be collaborating with our community partners to organize free or low cost application assistance clinics to help determine if applicants meet the eligibility requirements and to help to fill out paperwork.
  • In the meantime, if you have questions about the eligibility requirements, there are information sessions being held around the city by different community groups.  Also, the Mayor’s Office of New Bostonians offers an immigration clinic with free legal consultations with volunteer attorneys the first and third Wednesday of every month from 12PM – 2PM at Boston City Hall.
  • To view the calendar of information session in the City of Boston and for more detailed information about the executive action go to www.cityofboston.gov/newbostonians/ or call the Mayor’s Office of New Bostonians at 617-635-2980.

DEFERRED ACTION FOR PARENTS OF US CITIZENS AND LAWFUL PERMANENT RESIDENTS (DAPA) [3]

To qualify you must:

  • Be the parent of a U.S. citizen or lawful permanent resident (“green card holder”) on November 20, 2014;
  • Have lived in the U.S. since January 1, 2010;
  • Be here in the U.S. on November 20, 2014;
  • Have no lawful immigration status in the U.S. on November 20, 2014 (undocumented); and
  • Pass a criminal background check.

To prepare:
YOU CANNOT APPLY YET. Applications will be available no later than May 19, 2015.

1. Save money for filing fees ($465)
2. Gather evidence to show you qualify

  • Proof of identity
  • Documents showing relationship with U.S. citizen or LPR child
  • Presence and Residence in the United States from January 1, 2010
  • Presence in the United States on November 20, 2014

3. Criminal History

  • Gather any criminal records that you have
  • Contact a licensed lawyer or BIA accredited representative with any questions or concerns

DEFERRED ACTION FOR CHILDHOOD ARRIVALS (DACA)
To qualify you must:

  • Show that you’ve lived in the country since January 1, 2010;
  • Be under 16 years of age at the time of entry;
  • Have graduated from high school or have obtained a GED certificate or be an honorably discharged veteran of the Coast Guard or Armed Forces of the United States, or are currently in school;
  • Have not been convicted of any serious crimes; and
  • Be at least fifteen years old on the date you apply.

To prepare:
YOU CANNOT APPLY YET. Applications will be available no later than February 18, 2015.

1. Save money for filing fees ($465)
2. Gather evidence to show you qualify

  • Proof of identity

  • Proof of education or military service
  • Presence and Residence in the United States from January 1, 2010
  • Presence in the United States on November 20, 2014

3. Criminal History

  • Gather any criminal records that you have

  • Contact a licensed lawyer or BIA accredited representative with any questions or concerns

[1] http://www.uscis.gov/immigrationaction
[2] http://www.uscis.gov/avoid-scams/find-legal-services
[3] http://www.AdminRelief.org


How can I get more information?
For more information please call 617-635-2980.
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